California needs to rebuild its infrastructure systems

California needs to rebuild its infrastructure systems

California, the biggest as well as the most populous state in the U.S., is known for its growth in technology sector and groundbreaking products. But some experts believe that it needs to rebuild its infrastructure systems to protect its lead.

A big majority of the Golden State's transportation and other infrastructure systems are now decades old as they were built between the 1950s and 1970s. Some facts that make the idea of rebuilding the state's infrastructure more compelling include its fast-growing population.

In the early 1970s, California had a population of only 27 million and its economy was a much smaller and less diverse. Today, the state has a population of more than 38 million people and estimates suggest that the number of people living in the state will grow to 50 million by the year of 2040.

The population growth will lead to increase in demand for roads, rails and airways as more people will travel for work, vacation and other activities. Currently, California has nearly 32 million registered vehicles.

In addition to transportation system, the state will need to improve its water delivery and freight systems. More investments are needed to put into water storage systems as the state is increasingly becoming a drought-prone state.

Gov. Jerry Brown knows the importance of robust infrastructure systems well. That is why he set ambitious goals to push forward the country's first high-speed rail system, the Bay Delta Conservation Plan, and encouraged lawmakers to tackle the deferred maintenance of the state's roads and bridges.

Improvements in transportation and other infrastructure systems are required not only to accommodate the state's growing population but also to help residents thrive smoothly.