Deteriorating sense of smell is an early indicator of Alzheimer’s disease

Deteriorating sense of smell is an early indicator of Alzheimer’s disease

Losing sense of smell is linked Alzheimer’s, finds a new research. Alzheimer’s Society has welcomed the study findings, which adds value to the already growing evidence that losing sense of smell is an early hint of Alzheimer’s disease.
In the study, the researchers at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester in Minnesota have assessed the sense of smell among 1,430 people aged 79 years. When the study was started, no one showed any sign of dementia and all the participants were in healthy state.

The participants were followed for a period of three and half years and 250 of them developed mild cognitive impairment. The researchers suspected that deterioration in that part of the brain having link with smell is also associated with memory.

Their suspicion turned out to be true as rise in participants’ inability to identify led to rise in their chances of developing memory problems and Alzheimer’s disease. The researchers also came to know that elderly having poor sense of smell were at increased risk to suffer from amnesic mild cognitive impairment and progression of Alzheimer’s disease.

“Clinical implications of our findings are that odor identification tests may have use for early detection of persons at risk of cognitive outcomes”, said lead researcher Rosebud O. Roberts.
Many researchers have said that more research should be carried out. There is a possibility that in the coming time, sniff tests will include scans and tests to know about dementia as early as possible.