VW says it had understated CO2 emissions on many fewer vehicles than initially feared

VW says it had understated CO2 emissions on many fewer vehicles than initially feared

In a statement released on Wednesday, beleaguered German automaker Volkswagen (VW) said that its latest investigations have revealed that it had understated carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions on notably much fewer vehicles than initially feared.

VW is battling a diesel emissions-cheating scandal, which affects nearly 11 million of its diesel cars worldwide. The diesel emission cheating on the part of VW was detected by the US Environmental Protection Agency in September. However, in November, the automaker announced that it had also understated fuel economy and CO2 emissions in its vehicles sold in Europe.

In reporting the fuel economy and CO2 emissions problem last month, VW had said that the issue affected nearly 800,000 of its cars in Europe. But, on Wednesday, the company announced that the retesting of the vehicles for fuel economy and CO2 emissions has revealed that the problem affects only around 36,000 vehicles.

In fact, VW has not only asserted that its original measurements of fuel economy and CO2 emissions were accurate for the vast majority of the vehicles, but has also said that the discrepancies in fuel economy and CO2 might be small enough that the automaker may not have to reimburse any tax breaks.

According to VW’s assertion, the fuel data on the affected 36,000 or so vehicles was off by the equivalent of less than two miles per gallon, while the CO2 emission figures were off by a “few grams” per 100 kilometers (approximately 60 miles) traveled.