University College London scientists write chicken-and-egg question has finally got answer

University College London scientists write chicken-and-egg question has finally got answer

An international team of scientists said that animal life exploded on our planet post oxygen built up over a 100-million-year period. They said that it was not the other way round. In the academic journal Nature Communications, Dr. Philip Pogge von Strandmann, from University College London and colleagues wrote that the chicken-and-egg question has finally got the answer.

This new study has also come up with an answer to the long-debated question about how much time Earth’s oceans and atmosphere took in becoming oxygenated.

A senior lecturer on isotope chemistry at UCL’s Department of Earth Sciences, Dr. Pogge von Strandmann, and co-authors from the UK, the USA and Denmark explained that the rise in oxygen levels began notably earlier than had been thought previously. The rise took place in fits and has started over an extended period.

Thus, they have come to a conclusion that rising oxygen levels had prompted early animal evolution, and that it was not prompted by an alteration in the behavior of animal which brought about oxygenation.

Dr. Pogge von Strandmann said that they motive is to determine how life evolution is associated with the evolution of our climate. Dr. Pogge added, “The question on how strongly life has actively modified Earth’s climate, and why the Earth has been habitable for so long is extremely important for understanding both the climate system, and why life is on Earth in the first place”.